Malaysian Air Force chief says missing plane may have turned back


Malaysian-AirAs the whereabouts of the Malaysia Airlines plane continue to be a mystery, the hunt for the missing plane resumed on Sunday morning, with the US and China dispatching warships to assist in the mission.

It’s been more than 30 hours that Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 with 239 people on board disappeared mysteriously en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur.

In the latest revelation, Malaysian Air Force chief told a news conference that a recording from the military radar suggested that the missing jet may have made a turnback towards Kuala Lumpur.

“There is a distinct possibility the airplane did a turn-back, deviating from the course,” said General Rodzali Daud.

“One of the possibilities is that it was returning to Kuala Lumpur,” he added.

However, Malaysian Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said that had the plane turned back, it would have set off alarm bells.

The hunt for the plane re-started on Sunday morning but there were no signs yet of any wreckage.

The search has been intensified as twenty-two aircraft and 40 ships are now involved in the hunt, armed forces chief Gen Zulkefli Zin said.

In a statement, the Malaysian Airlines said that it was “fearing for the worst” and had roped in a disaster recovery management specialist from Atlanta, USA to aid in the SAR mission.

A Malaysian minister hasn’t ruled out the terror link to the plane’s disappearance, saying that the government was probing the possibility of a terror angle.