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Letters to the Editor: May 22, 2019

Lower turn-out of voters in Delhi

Voter turnout in Delhi for electing seven members of new Lok Sabha is a cause of worry and needs to be analyzed. Polling-day should preferably be in mid-week working-day so that people may remain in the city for voting.

The lower turn-out of voters can also be a sign of victory of ruling BJP because voters against the ruling party might have missed voting due to split in opposition with no alliance between opposing main parties Congress and Aam Aadmi Party AAP.

Voters being fed up with professional politicians contesting elections showing faces to the public only during election-festival can be yet other reason. The right step would be to convert NOTA (None-Of-The-Above) into Right-To-Reject with riders where the fresh election may be held in case NOTA winning in a constituency with rest others losing the right to contest any election in life. However, this option can be disabled from EVMs in by-elections caused due to NOTA-winning to prevent the chain of elections with NOTA winning even in by-elections. Then parties coming on the third or later positions may themselves opt out paving way for direct elections. The system will make political parties giving the best candidates who may even win votes of supporters of rival parties.

Subhash Chandra Agrawal

 

Exit polls deter opposition

The exit poll results have deterred the entire opposition so much that all the ‘chair’ greedy politicians like Chandrababu Naidu and Rahul Gandhi are running from pillar to post to ensure the ‘defeat’ of the Modi government at any cost. TDP, Congress, NCP, RJD, TMC, Left or no other political party’s ‘Neta’ is interested in serving the nation but they all want political power to earn ‘monetary power’ in the next five years. They all must be scared of the Modi Sarkar, perhaps to save and protect their trillions of rupees and the US dollars stashed by them in few banks in India as well as abroad.

Hansraj Bhat

 

Mumbai looking like a war-torn city

Your editorial ‘BMC needs to be battle ready this monsoon’ made for interesting reading. BMC in all probability will get themselves exposed in the first showers to hit the city. The monsoon is just a few days away but the whole city is dug up for one reason or the other with no sign of completion of work. The stormwater project to widen gutters were undertaken very late and don’t think it would help prevent flooding. The metro work is in a mess and Mumbaikars should prepare themselves for a long haul of troubles this year.

The state government should work in tandem with BMC and should even hire top corporate infrastructure companies to complete work started by the civic body which is progressing at a snail’s pace. The parliamentary elections too are responsible for slow work as everybody’s focus were on polls which are the reason why Mumbai is today looking like a war-torn city. Hope better sense prevails and all departments work overtime to ease city of its monsoon-related issues!

S.N. Kabra 

 

Why Congress did not change the system of appointing ECs?

It refers to Congress and other opposition parties strongly criticizing present Chief Election Commissioner for the allegedly biased role in favour of ruling BJP during Lok Sabha. Leave apart merit in allegations if any, the big question is why Congress in its long regime did not change the system of appointing Election Commissioners. Congress was also alleged by the then opposition for appointing certain individuals of its favour as Election Commissioners.

However with several other posts like Central Vigilance Commissioners and Central Information Commissioners having a system of appointments by a collegium also consisting opposition-leader, appointment of Election Commissioners requiring even more political neutrality must be selected by a collegium preferably consisting of non-political persons like Chief Justice of India, Central Vigilance Commissioner, Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) on a panel of names forwarded by the Union Cabinet Secretary. Any collegium consisting of two from political rulers and one from opposition party can select a person of choice of government by the majority.

Madhu Agrawal


(The views expressed by the author in the article are his/her own.)
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